Weebit Nano to partner with the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi on a Neuromorphic RRAM project

Israel-based SiOx RRAM developer Weebit Nano announced that it will partner with the Non-Volatile Memory Research Group of the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD) to work jointly on a Neuromorphic RRAM project.
Weebit packaged RRAM chip photoThe NVMRG group will research the use of Weebit Nano’s SiOx RRAM technology for certain types of neuromorphic applications, which are used for artificial intelligence. RRAM devices are very promising candidates for enabling high-density and ultimately scaled synaptic arrays in neuromorphic architectures as they are significantly smaller and more energy efficient than current AI data centers, and mimic the brain’s biological computation at the neuron and synaptic level.

Weebit Nano raised $2.16 million to advance its SiOx RRAM technology

Israel-based SiOx RRAM developer Weebit Nano has raised $3 million AUD ($2.16 million USD) via a share placement and the company also plans to raise a further $1 million soon. Weebit's board of directors invested $150,000 as part of this placement.
Weebit packaged RRAM chip photo

Weebit recently announced that it has packaged its first memory devices into chips, which can now be shipped to its partners. The first RRAM memory will be delivered to universities to research the use of ReRAM technology in neuromorphic computing, and additional chips are planned to be shipped to commercial partners.

Weebit Nano packaged its RRAM chips for the first time

Israel-based SiOx RRAM developer Weebit Nano announced that it has packaged its first memory devices into chips, which can now be shipped to its partners. The company says that its first RRAM memory will be delivered to universities to research the use of ReRAM technology in neuromorphic computing.

Weebit packaged RRAM chip photo

Additional chips are planned to be shipped to commercial partners once they engage to explore the possibility to work with Weebit Nano’s technology.

Weebit Nano produced a 1Mb RRAM array at 40 nm

Weebit Nano logoIsrael-based SiOx RRAM developer Weebit Nano announced that it produced a 1Mb array of its silicon-oxide ReRAM at 40nm. The 1Mb initial tests, conducted in CEA/Leti facilities in Grenoble, France, demonstrated the capability of addressing and programming nearly all of the memory cells.

Last month Weebit and Leti extended their co-development agreement. In November 2017 we posted an interview with Weebit's new CEO, which explains the company's technolgoy and business.

Weebit Nano and Leti extend their RRAM co-development agreement

Israel-based SiOx RRAM developer Weebit Nano announced that it has extended its agreement with Leti to further develop and optimize Weebit’s ReRAM memory technology. Weebit says that this extension will allow it to accelerate the optimizing of the manufacturing process required to achieve industry standard capabilities with its Silicon Oxide (SiOx) ReRAM memory technology.

Weebit Nano RRAM chip prototypes photo

Weebit and Leti aim to demonstrate a 40nm 1Mb memory array by mid-2018. Weebit and Leti also plan to initiate work on 28nm nodes later this year. In November 2017 we posted an interview with Weebit's new CEO, which explains the company's technology and business.

Weebit announced working 40nm SiOx RRAM cell samples

Earlier this year, Weebit Nano announced that it aims to produce 40nm working SiOx RRAM cell samples by the end of 2017, and the company today announced that it achieved that milestone - one month ahead of schedule.

Weebit further reports that measurements performed on the 40nm memory cells on various wafers verified the ability of Weebit Nano SiOx ReRAM cells to maintain its memory behaviour in accordance with previous experiments performed on 300nm cells.

Weebit successfully demonstrated the reliability and endurance of its 300 nm 4Kb RRAM memory cells

Israel-based SiOx RRAM developer Weebit Nano recently announced success in demonstrating a 4Kbit array in 300nm. Weebit now updates that it has successfully demonstrated the reliability of data retention and endurance in its 300 nm 4Kb memory cells. data retention lifetime extrapolation demonstrated the ability to maintain written data for 10 years at above room temperature. In addition the chips maintained their data after 30 minutes at 260 degrees, exceeding the soldering requirements of 15 minutes at that temperatures.

Weebit Nano RRAM chip prototypes photo

Weebit says that these results successfully conclude the 300 nm 4Kb characterization. Weebit says that the endurance results are significantly higher than the program/erase cycling of existing Flash technology.

We discuss RRAM with Weebit Nano's new CEO

Coby Hanoch (Weebit)Israel-based Weebit Nano was established in 2014 with an aim to commercialize Rice University's SiOx RRAM technology. Weebit is progressing towards it stated goal of producing a 40nm RRAM Silicon Oxide working cell by the end of 2017.

Coby Hanoch was recently appointed as the company's new CEO, and was kind enough to answer a few questions we had. Coby was VP Worldwide sales at Verisity where he was part of the founding team and grew the company to over $100M sales per year. He was also VP Worldwide sales at Jasper. Mr Hanoch holds a Bachelor of Science in Systems Design from Technion – Israel Institute of Technology.

Q: Coby, you recently joined Weebit as a CEO. What made you excited about Weebit's technology and business?

I believe Weebit’s technology has great potential, especially considering the fact that it is based on standard materials and tools, so once we finish the development we should be able to move more easily into production than other emerging memory technologies I have come across. In addition, and probably more important than the technology, a key driver to the success of a company is the team, and I was very impressed by Weebit’s team and the atmosphere in the company.

Weebit Nano demonstrated a 300 nm 4Kb Silicon Oxide RRAM cell

Weebit Nano announced that it has managed to produce a 4Kb array on 300 nm cells, with 100% yield on selected arrays. Weebit says that this result validates its technology and that this demonstration was the final significant step towards the next goal for the company - a 40nm RRAM Silicon Oxide working cell by the end of 2017.

Data saved in Weebit Nano's 300nm 4Kbit array (Reset cells in orange)

Preliminary speed tests of Weebit's technology showed that write speeds could be 100 to 1000 times faster than traditional 3D Flash technology while using significantly lower energy.