RRAM-Info: the RRAM experts

RRAM-Info is a news hub and knowledge center for Resistive RAM technologies.

Resistive RAM is a non-volatile computer memory that uses materials that change their resistance - or memristors. RRAM is still in its early stages, but it may enable fast, efficient and small memory chips

Recent RRAM News

Weebit Nano and Leti extend their RRAM co-development agreement

Israel-based RRAM developer Weebit Nano announced that it has extended its agreement with Leti to further develop and optimize Weebit’s ReRAM memory technology. Weebit says that this extension will allow it to accelerate the optimizing of the manufacturing process required to achieve industry standard capabilities with its Silicon Oxide (SiOx) ReRAM memory technology.

Weebit and Leti aim to demonstrate a 40nm 1Mb memory array by mid-2018. Weebit and Leti also plan to initiate work on 28nm nodes later this year. In November 2017 we posted an interview with Weebit's new CEO, which explains the company's technology and business.

Rambus and GigaDevice launch a new company called Reliance Memory to commercialize embedded RRAM

Rambus, in collaboration with GigaDevice, launched a new company called Reliance Memory, to commercialize RRAM technology for embedded devices. Rambus also announced the strategic investment partners in Reliance Memory - THG Ventures, West Summit Capital, Walden International and Zhisland Capital.

Rambus is developing RRAM technologies since 2012, when it acquired Unity Semiconductor, an RRAM developer, for $35 million. In 2017 Rambus licensed its RRAM patents to Western Digital.

SER and CSIRO received a $100,000 AUD grant to develop methods to optimize SER's Memory Ink technology

Strategic Elements announced that it has been awarded $100,000 AUD together with CSIRO to fund trial a development of methods to optimize the levels of organic materials in the company's Memory Ink, for industrial level processes. The project was awarded to SER's 100% owned subsidiary, Australian Advanced Materials (AAM).

Strategic Elements glass-based transparent RRAMprototype

SER also announced that it expects to receive $840,000 AUD under the Australian Federal Government Research and Development rebate.

Weebit announced working 40nm SiOx RRAM cell samples

Weebit Nano logoEarlier this year, Weebit Nano announced that it aims to produce 40nm working SiOx RRAM cell samples by the end of 2017, and the company today announced that it achieved that milestone - one month ahead of schedule.

Weebit further reports that measurements performed on the 40nm memory cells on various wafers verified the ability of Weebit Nano SiOx ReRAM cells to maintain its memory behaviour in accordance with previous experiments performed on 300nm cells.

Weebit successfully demonstrated the reliability and endurance of its 300 nm 4Kb RRAM memory cells

Israel-based RRAM developer Weebit Nano recently announced success in demonstrating a 4Kbit array in 300nm. Weebit now updates that it has successfully demonstrated the reliability of data retention and endurance in its 300 nm 4Kb memory cells. data retention lifetime extrapolation demonstrated the ability to maintain written data for 10 years at above room temperature. In addition the chips maintained their data after 30 minutes at 260 degrees, exceeding the soldering requirements of 15 minutes at that temperatures.

Weebit Nano RRAM chip prototypes photo

Weebit says that these results successfully conclude the 300 nm 4Kb characterization. Weebit says that the endurance results are significantly higher than the program/erase cycling of existing Flash technology.

We discuss RRAM with Weebit Nano's new CEO

Coby Hanoch (Weebit)Israel-based Weebit Nano was established in 2014 with an aim to commercialize Rice University's SiOx RRAM technology. Weebit is progressing towards it stated goal of producing a 40nm RRAM Silicon Oxide working cell by the end of 2017.

Coby Hanoch was recently appointed as the company's new CEO, and was kind enough to answer a few questions we had. Coby was VP Worldwide sales at Verisity where he was part of the founding team and grew the company to over $100M sales per year. He was also VP Worldwide sales at Jasper. Mr Hanoch holds a Bachelor of Science in Systems Design from Technion – Israel Institute of Technology.

Q: Coby, you recently joined Weebit as a CEO. What made you excited about Weebit's technology and business?

I believe Weebit’s technology has great potential, especially considering the fact that it is based on standard materials and tools, so once we finish the development we should be able to move more easily into production than other emerging memory technologies I have come across. In addition, and probably more important than the technology, a key driver to the success of a company is the team, and I was very impressed by Weebit’s team and the atmosphere in the company.