Strategic Elements and USNW to optimize RRAM technology and develop demonstrator applications

Strategic Elements announces has signed an agreement with the University of New South Wales (UNSW) to further optimize the company's Nanocube Memory Ink flexible/transparent RRAM technology. UNSW and SER will also develop demonstrator applications for the new technology.
Strategic Elements glass-based transparent RRAMprototype

UNSW will begin the research by assessing potential demonstrator applications in areas such as multi-functional capacitive sensors that can detect the type and strength of external stimuli including curvature, pressure, strain, and touch with clear distinction. It will also look into developing memory arrays that will fulfill the growing requirement for local digital data storage on flexible sensors, tags, wearables and high value consumer packaging.

We discuss RRAM with Weebit Nano's new CEO

Coby Hanoch (Weebit)Israel-based Weebit Nano was established in 2014 with an aim to commercialize Rice University's SiOx RRAM technology. Weebit is progressing towards it stated goal of producing a 40nm RRAM Silicon Oxide working cell by the end of 2017.

Coby Hanoch was recently appointed as the company's new CEO, and was kind enough to answer a few questions we had. Coby was VP Worldwide sales at Verisity where he was part of the founding team and grew the company to over $100M sales per year. He was also VP Worldwide sales at Jasper. Mr Hanoch holds a Bachelor of Science in Systems Design from Technion – Israel Institute of Technology.

Q: Coby, you recently joined Weebit as a CEO. What made you excited about Weebit's technology and business?

I believe Weebit’s technology has great potential, especially considering the fact that it is based on standard materials and tools, so once we finish the development we should be able to move more easily into production than other emerging memory technologies I have come across. In addition, and probably more important than the technology, a key driver to the success of a company is the team, and I was very impressed by Weebit’s team and the atmosphere in the company.

Crossbar ramps up 40nm RRAM production, signs-up 12 MCU/SoC companies as licensees

In March 2016 Crossbar announced its strategic partnership with Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation (SMIC) to co-develop and produce RRAM technologies. In January 2017 Crossbar announced that it started sampling RRAM chips.

In an interesting interview with Electronic Design, Crossbar's Vice President of Strategic Marketing & Business Development, Sylvain Dubois, discloses that Crossbar has started to ramp up production, and has signed a dozen agreements to license its technology to MCU/SoC companies. Crossbar's current developments are targeting embedded ReRAM IPs integrated in MCUs/SoCs for IoT, consumer electronics, artificial intelligence, and industrial applications.

Western Digital: RRAM is the technology of choice for Storage Class Memory

Western Digital announced that its 3D RRAM development is "finished" (this developed started by SanDisk, which is now owned by WD). WD's current plan is to release memory products based on 3D RRAM in 12-24 months - in the same fab that produces flash (NAND) memory.

Western Digital: 3D RRAM SCM choice slide

Western Digital will at first aim to use RRAM in "specialized" SCM memory devices, but the plan is to scale up RRAM to eventually (2020?) become a "Universal Memory".

SanDisk expects RRAM to enter the enterprise storage market in 2018

Sandisk logoIn October 2015 SanDisk announced a partnership with HP to co-develop RRAM technologies, enhance SanDisk's RRAM tech with HP's memristor technologies. Eventually, SanDisk will provide its RRAM memory tech to HP that will embed it in its products.

According to SanDisk's enterprise storage manager and senior VP, John Scaramuzzo, SanDisk expects the first RRAM chips to appear in enterprise storage products in 2018. The company expects RRAM to "revolutionize" storage storage architectures once it gets productized.

Adesto introduces new ultra low-power CBRAM chips

Adesto Technologies introduced a new CBRAM (a type of RRAM memory) chip family, called the Moneta. These are ultra-low power memory solutions, designed to reduce overall system energy use in connected devices.

Adesto CBRAM chips

Moneta chips perform read and write operations at 50-100x lower power than competitive solutions. The company is now shipping samples in four densities: 32Kbit, 64Kbit, 128Kbit, and 256Kbit.