Strategic Elements to extend its collaboration with CSIRO with support from the Australian government

Strategic Elements announces that it has received financial support from the Australian government to extend the development of its Nanocube RRAM memory ink with CSIRO. The $100,00 grant will be co-funded by the government and SER.
Strategic Elements glass-based transparent RRAMprototypeThe program of work at CSIRO is expected to be conducted over a 12-week period, and SER will make progress updates where appropriate.

Weebit Nano raised $2.16 million to advance its SiOx RRAM technology

Israel-based SiOx RRAM developer Weebit Nano has raised $3 million AUD ($2.16 million USD) via a share placement and the company also plans to raise a further $1 million soon. Weebit's board of directors invested $150,000 as part of this placement.
Weebit packaged RRAM chip photo

Weebit recently announced that it has packaged its first memory devices into chips, which can now be shipped to its partners. The first RRAM memory will be delivered to universities to research the use of ReRAM technology in neuromorphic computing, and additional chips are planned to be shipped to commercial partners.

Weebit Nano packaged its RRAM chips for the first time

Israel-based SiOx RRAM developer Weebit Nano announced that it has packaged its first memory devices into chips, which can now be shipped to its partners. The company says that its first RRAM memory will be delivered to universities to research the use of ReRAM technology in neuromorphic computing.

Weebit packaged RRAM chip photo

Additional chips are planned to be shipped to commercial partners once they engage to explore the possibility to work with Weebit Nano’s technology.

Strategic Elements updates on its Memory Ink status

Strategic Elements announces an updates regarding its Memory Ink project status - and said that it has recently tested its spin-coated Memory Ink device (based on a glass substrate and silver electrodes). The tests, performed at UNSW, were successful and 100% of the memory cells operated successfully and showed "suitable" endurance.

Strategic Elements glass-based transparent RRAMprototype

SER is working with CSIRO, which reproduced the tests done at UNSW successfully - although the endurance results achieved at UNSW could not be repeated. SER will continue to work with UNSW to understand the variability in process and results. The company is also looking into a collaboration with VTT Finland.

DB HiTek licenses Adesto's CBRAM technology for 180nm

Adesto Technologies announced that DB HiTek (formerly known as Dongbu HiTek) has licensed its RRAM (CBRAM) memory technology. DB HiTek will use Adesto's RRAM as its embedded non-volatile memory for IoT and other ultra-low power customer designs.

DB HiTek is a South Korea based analog and mixed-signal foundry, and it will use Adesto's technology at 180nm. DB HiTek says that Adesto's CBRAM operates at lower voltages, consumes less power and requires fewer processing steps compared to conventional embedded flash technologies.

Weebit Nano produced a 1Mb RRAM array at 40 nm

Weebit Nano logoIsrael-based SiOx RRAM developer Weebit Nano announced that it produced a 1Mb array of its silicon-oxide ReRAM at 40nm. The 1Mb initial tests, conducted in CEA/Leti facilities in Grenoble, France, demonstrated the capability of addressing and programming nearly all of the memory cells.

Last month Weebit and Leti extended their co-development agreement. In November 2017 we posted an interview with Weebit's new CEO, which explains the company's technolgoy and business.